Top Ten Tuesday: Winter Break 2018 TBR

Top Ten Tuesday: Winter Break 2018 TBR www.onemorestamp.com
Top Ten Tuesday  was created by  The Broke and the Bookish  in June of 2010 and was moved to  That Artsy Reader Girl  in January of 2018.

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.


The Librarian of Auschwitzby Antonio Iturbe

The Librarian of Auschwitz
by Antonio Iturbe

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: October 20th 2017
Recommended by: one of my students

From Goodreads:

Life, any life, is very short. But if you’ve managed to be happy for at least an instant, it will have been worth living.

Based on the experience of real-life Auschwitz prisoner Dita Kraus, this is the incredible story of a girl who risked her life to keep the magic of books alive during the Holocaust.
Fourteen-year-old Dita is one of the many imprisoned by the Nazis at Auschwitz. Taken, along with her mother and father, from the Terezín ghetto in Prague, Dita is adjusting to the constant terror that is life in the camp. When Jewish leader Freddy Hirsch asks Dita to take charge of the eight precious volumes the prisoners have managed to sneak past the guards, she agrees. And so Dita becomes the librarian of Auschwitz. 

Out of one of the darkest chapters of human history comes this extraordinary story of courage and hope. 


Tiffany Sly Lives Here Nowby Dana L. Davis 

Tiffany Sly Lives Here Now
by Dana L. Davis 

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: May 1st 2018 
Recommended by: twitter

From Goodreads:

What happens when God doesn’t answer prayers?

I’ve got seven days to come clean to my new dad. Seven days to tell the truth…

For sixteen-year-old Tiffany Sly, life hasn’t been safe or normal for a while. Losing her mom to cancer has her a little bit traumatized and now she has to leave her hometown of Chicago to live with the biological dad she’s never known.

Anthony Stone is a rich man with four other daughters—and rules for every second of the day. Tiffany tries to make the best of things, but she doesn’t fit into her new luxurious, but super-strict, home—or get along with her standoffish sister London. The only thing that makes her new life even remotely bearable is the strange boy across the street. Marcus McKinney has had his own experiences with death, and the unexpected friendship that blossoms between them is the only thing that makes her feel grounded.

But Tiffany has a secret. Another man claims he’s Tiffany’s real dad—and she only has seven days before he shows up to demand a paternity test and the truth comes out. With her life about to fall apart all over again, Tiffany finds herself discovering unexpected truths about her father, her mother and herself, and realizing that maybe family is in the bonds you make—and that life means sometimes taking risks.


Odd One Out by Nic Stone

Odd One Out
by Nic Stone 

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: October 9th 2018
Recommended by: Autobuy author

From Goodreads:

Life is a journey without a map, and as such, we’ll all encounter twists and turns that force us to correct our course or change directions entirely.

From the author of Dear Martin comes this exploration of old friendships, new crushes, and the path to self-discovery.

Courtney "Coop" Cooper
Dumped. Again. And normally I wouldn't mind. But right now, my best friend and source of solace, Jupiter Sanchez, is ignoring me to text some girl. 

Rae Evelyn Chin
I assumed "new girl" would be synonymous with "pariah," but Jupiter and Courtney make me feel like I'm right where I belong. I also want to kiss him. And her. Which is . . . perplexing.

Jupiter Charity-Sanchez
The only thing worse than losing the girl you love to a boy is losing her to your boy. That means losing him, too. I have to make a move. . . .

One story.
Three sides.
No easy answers.


An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

An American Marriage
by Tayari Jones

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: February 6th 2018
Recommended by: my friend Gabrielle

From Goodreads:

Much of life is timing and circumstance, I see that now.

Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are the embodiment of both the American Dream and the New South. He is a young executive and she is an artist on the brink of an exciting career. But as they settle into the routine of their life together, they are ripped apart by circumstances neither could have imagined. In this deft exploration of love, loyalty, race, justice, and both Black masculinity and Black womanhood in 21st century America, Jones achieves that most-illusive of all literary goals: the Great American Novel. 


Speak Easy, Speak Love by McKelle George

Speak Easy, Speak Love
by McKelle George

Goodreads | Amazon
Series: Stand Alone
Published: September 19th 2017
Recommended by: I think Cait from Paperfury

From Goodreads:

What are you rambling about, you nonsensical contradiction?

Six teenagers’ lives intertwine during one thrilling summer full of romantic misunderstandings and dangerous deals in this sparkling retelling of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing.

After she gets kicked out of boarding school, seventeen-year-old Beatrice goes to her uncle’s estate on Long Island. But Hey Nonny Nonny is more than just a rundown old mansion. Beatrice’s cousin, Hero, runs a struggling speakeasy out of the basement—one that might not survive the summer. Along with Prince, a poor young man determined to prove his worth; his brother John, a dark and dangerous agent of the local mob; Benedick, a handsome trust-fund kid trying to become a writer; and Maggie, a beautiful and talented singer; Beatrice and Hero throw all their efforts into planning a massive party to save the speakeasy. Despite all their worries, the summer is beautiful, love is in the air, and Beatrice and Benedick are caught up in a romantic battle of wits that their friends might be quietly orchestrating in the background.

Hilariously clever and utterly charming, McKelle George’s debut novel is full of intrigue and 1920s charm. For fans of Jenny Han, Stephanie Perkins, and Anna Godbersen.


Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Livesby Gary Younge

Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives
by Gary Younge

Goodreads | Amazon
Series: Stand Alone
Published: October 4th 2016
Recommended by: Goodreads

The circumstances into which people are born and the range of opportunities to which they are exposed shape both the choices available to them and the process by which they make those choices even if they, ultimately, still make the choice.

From Goodreads:

On an average day in America, seven children and teens will be shot dead. In Another Day in the Death of America, award-winning journalist Gary Younge tells the stories of the lives lost during one such day. It could have been any day, but he chose November 23, 2013. Black, white, and Latino, aged nine to nineteen, they fell at sleepovers, on street corners, in stairwells, and on their own doorsteps. From the rural Midwest to the barrios of Texas, the narrative crisscrosses the country over a period of twenty-four hours to reveal the full human stories behind the gun-violence statistics and the brief mentions in local papers of lives lost.

This powerful and moving work puts a human face—a child’s face—on the “collateral damage” of gun deaths across the country. This is not a book about gun control, but about what happens in a country where it does not exist. What emerges in these pages is a searing and urgent portrait of youth, family, and firearms in America today.


A beguiling exploration of the joys of reading across boundaries, inspired by the author's year-long journey through a book from every country.  Following an impulse to read more internationally, journalist Ann Morgan undertook first to define "the world" and then to find a story from each of 196 nations. Tireless in her quest and assisted by generous, far-flung strangers, Morgan discovered not only a treasury of world literature but also the keys to unlock it. Whether considering the difficulties faced by writers in developing nations, movingly illustrated by Burundian Marie-Thérese Toyi's Weep Not, Refugee; tracing the use of local myths in the fantastically successful Samoan YA series Telesa; delving into questions of censorship and propaganda while sourcing a title from North Korea; or simply getting hold of The Corsair, the first Qatari novel to be translated into English, Morgan illuminates with wit, warmth, and insight how stories are written the world over and how place-geographical, historical, virtual-shapes the books we read and write.

The World Between Two Covers: Reading the Globe
by Ann Morgan

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: May 4th 2015
Recommended by: Goodreads

True story: I almost never like translated works. I want to. I buy them. Then the awkwardness of the translation sets in and I. CANNOT. TAKE. IT.

From Goodreads:

A beguiling exploration of the joys of reading across boundaries, inspired by the author's year-long journey through a book from every country.

Following an impulse to read more internationally, journalist Ann Morgan undertook first to define "the world" and then to find a story from each of 196 nations. Tireless in her quest and assisted by generous, far-flung strangers, Morgan discovered not only a treasury of world literature but also the keys to unlock it. Whether considering the difficulties faced by writers in developing nations, movingly illustrated by Burundian Marie-Thérese Toyi's Weep Not, Refugee; tracing the use of local myths in the fantastically successful Samoan YA series Telesa; delving into questions of censorship and propaganda while sourcing a title from North Korea; or simply getting hold of The Corsair, the first Qatari novel to be translated into English, Morgan illuminates with wit, warmth, and insight how stories are written the world over and how place-geographical, historical, virtual-shapes the books we read and write. 


Becoming by Michelle Obama

Becoming
by Michelle Obama

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: November 13th 2018 
Recommended by: the whole world

Another preorder that I haven’t gotten around to. I also have the audiobook and I think that that is the way I am going to go. I hadn’t thought that I would read this as autobiographies aren’t usually my cuppa but the review in The New Yorker and the New York Times swayed me. Plus, Michelle Obama is the very definition of grace under fire.

From Goodreads:

If you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States.

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America—the first African-American to serve in that role—she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare. 

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms. 

Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations—and whose story inspires us to do the same. 


The Whale Rider by Witi Ihimaera

The Whale Rider
by Witi Ihimaera

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: January 1st 1987
Recommended by: reading on my trip to New Zealand

I actually read this forever ago but I was in high school and it was an assignment. This time I am planning on reading it as we drive all around NZ so my enjoyment level will rise in proportion.

From Goodreads:

He loved them deeply, but sometimes love becomes a power game between the ambitions that parents have for their children and the ambitions that children have for themselves.

Eight-year-old Kahu, a member of the Maori tribe of Whangara, New Zealand, fights to prove her love, her leadership, and her destiny. Her people claim descent from Kahutia Te Rangi, the legendary ‘whale rider.’ In every generation since Kahutia, a male heir has inherited the title of chief. But now there is no male heir, and the aging chief is desperate to find a successor. Kahu is his only great-grandchild—and Maori tradition has no use for a girl. But when hundreds of whales beach themselves and threaten the future of the Maori tribe, Kahu will do anything to save them—even the impossible.



The Gentleman's Guide to Vice and Virtue 

by Mackenzi Lee 

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Montague Siblings, #1
Published: June 27th 2017 
Recommended by: Gabrielle

I actually preordered this book but I have been doing that thing where I avoid reading a book that I absolutely know I will love because I am waiting for the right time to present itself, or something. Yeah, it doens’t make sense to me either. But since the second book of the series is out not I think it is time to dive in.

From Goodreads:

Question?

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Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Destinations

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Destinations www.onemorestamp.com
Top Ten Tuesday  was created by  The Broke and the Bookish  in June of 2010 and was moved to  That Artsy Reader Girl  in January of 2018.

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

When given a Top Ten Freebie my brain vacillates wildly between books and food and books and travel. Since I have written about books and food before a few times I thought I would try to think about some of the most impressive bookish destinations that I have personally visited.

I am also wondering what some of your favorites are or what places are on your wishlist? There is still so much of the world to be seen.


source - My pictures all sucked

source- My pictures all sucked

Reading room of the British Museum
London, Great Britain

This might not be the coziest reading room in the world. It is probably the most impressive.


The Long Room of the Old Library of Trinity College
Dublin, Ireland

After you have been shuffled through to see the Book of Kells your reward is a walk through the Long Room. If someone could just figure out a way to get a replica in my apartment I would be grateful.


New York City Public Library
New York City, USA

It may be the most beautiful library building in the world.


The Strand
New York City, USA

18 miles of books. Sold. The only thing that kept me from losing my mind and buying eighteen pounds of books was the daunting thought of four international flight before getting home.


Source  the place is too big to take a decent picture of

Source the place is too big to take a decent picture of

Binhai Library
Tianjin, China

Let the traveller beware. I mean, I knew that I wasn’t going to be able to read any of the books (because Chinese) but that wasn’t the disappointing part. The space looks AMAZING, unfortunately the books aren’t real. That’s right, almost all of them are some sort of textured wallpaper. It is a good thing that I only wasted a Saturday visiting because I would have had to do some major pouting if I wasn’t already in China. This is the very definition of style over substance.


Shakespeare & Company
Paris, France

I don’t just love this store because I had been engaged for about three minutes the last time I was there. There is nothing more perfect that a fall afternoon in Paris looking though books and then perhaps eating pastry. Heaven.


Frankfurt book convention
Frankfurt, Germany

Less fun than anticipated it is still a rush to be surrounded by that many books.


The Elephant House
Edinburgh, Scotland

While the book picking are slim here it is a bookish destination simply due to the fact that JK Rowling wrote a good portion of the first Harry Potter book here. If you walk a block or so there is a cemetery that overlooks the grounds of a private school that was an inspiration for Hogwarts. I couldn’t find it but I assume that there is also a place to file a complaint about not getting my Hogwarts letter.


The University of al-Qarawiyyin
Fez, Morocco

The oldest university in the world founded by a Muslim woman. Take that Western biases. You can’t really go in but if you manage to find it in the maze of Fez’s Medina you can casually walk by the door a dozen or so times to absorb the smartness. Not that I did that. I am much too cool.


Plaza de Armas
Havana, Cuba

Do you need a Spanish copy of everything that Che Geverra ever wrote? Perhaps many many copies of The Old Man and the Sea or some other flavor of Ernest Hemingway? The Plaza de Armes in the old town of Havana is rife with pop up book stalls that offer up a more sophisticated beach read.


Is there a bookish destination that you have always wanted to visit?

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Top Ten Tuesday: Cozy Winter Reads

Top Ten Tuesday  was created by  The Broke and the Bookish  in June of 2010 and was moved to  That Artsy Reader Girl  in January of 2018.

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

These books might not be as cozy as I anticipated but I guarantee that they are wintery.


The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey

The Snow Child
by Eowyn Ivey

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: February 1st 2012
Rating: a literary fairy tale
Times read: 1
Recommended by: Goodreads

From Goodreads:

In my old age, I see that life itself is often more fantastic and terrible than the stories we believed as children, and that perhaps there is no harm in finding magic among the trees.

Alaska, 1920: a brutal place to homestead, and especially tough for recent arrivals Jack and Mabel. Childless, they are drifting apart--he breaking under the weight of the work of the farm; she crumbling from loneliness and despair. In a moment of levity during the season's first snowfall, they build a child out of snow. The next morning the snow child is gone--but they glimpse a young, blonde-haired girl running through the trees. This little girl, who calls herself Faina, seems to be a child of the woods. She hunts with a red fox at her side, skims lightly across the snow, and somehow survives alone in the Alaskan wilderness. As Jack and Mabel struggle to understand this child who could have stepped from the pages of a fairy tale, they come to love her as their own daughter. But in this beautiful, violent place things are rarely as they appear, and what they eventually learn about Faina will transform all of them. 


Shivery  bMaggie Stiefvater

Shiver
By
Maggie Stiefvater

Goodreads Amazon | Audible
Series: Wolves of Mercy Falls #1
Release date: August 1st, 2009
Rating: Full review of Shiver
Times read: 2
Recommended by: It’s Maggie Stiefvater

You can’t get more wintery then a book that starts every chapter with a temperature check. The cold is omnipresent and malevolent because with every degree the temperature goes down the closer in to losing his humanity. In the pantheon of werewolf stories this one is probably my favorite. There is a date to a candy shop and if thet isn’t my brand… Also, Sam is an adorable cinnamon roll of a character and needs to be protected at all costs.

From Goodreads:

It is possible to be in love with you just because of who you are.

For years, Grace has watched the wolves in the woods behind her house. One yellow-eyed wolf—her wolf—is a chilling presence she can't seem to live without.

Meanwhile, Sam has lived two lives: In winter, the frozen woods, the protection of the pack, and the silent company of a fearless girl. In summer, a few precious months of being human… until the cold makes him shift back again.

Now, Grace meets a yellow-eyed boy whose familiarity takes her breath away. It's her wolf. It has to be. But as winter nears, Sam must fight to stay human—or risk losing himself, and Grace, forever.


I have never seen a cover that I really like.

I have never seen a cover that I really like.

Anna Karenina
by Leo Tolstoy

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: April 1877
Rating: Possibly the greatest novel ever written?
Times read: 2
Recommended by: See rating above. I don’t think anyone is sleeping on this one.

I know that the whole book isn’t set in winter but my brain still likes to picture pretty much everything in a winter wonderland/wasteland. I regret nothing.

If you look for perfection, you’ll never be content.

From Goodreads:

Married to a powerful government minister, Anna Karenina is a beautiful woman who falls deeply in love with a wealthy army officer, the elegant Count Vronsky. Desperate to find truth and meaning in her life, she rashly defies the conventions of Russian society and leaves her husband and son to live with her lover. Condemned and ostracized by her peers and prone to fits of jealousy that alienate Vronsky, Anna finds herself unable to escape an increasingly hopeless situation.

Set against this tragic affair is the story of Konstantin Levin, a melancholy landowner whom Tolstoy based largely on himself. While Anna looks for happiness through love, Levin embarks on his own search for spiritual fulfillment through marriage, family, and hard work. Surrounding these two central plot threads are dozens of characters whom Tolstoy seamlessly weaves together, creating a breathtaking tapestry of nineteenth-century Russian society.

From its famous opening sentence — "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way”—to its stunningly tragic conclusion, this enduring tale of marriage and adultery plumbs the very depths of the human soul.


The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aike

The Wolves of Willoughby Chase
by Joan Aiken

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: The Wolves Chronicles #1
Published: 1962
Rating: nostalgia
Times read: 10? A lot. A whole lot.
Recommended by: I went to stay with my grandma when I was 8 or so and we listened to this in her car as we drove around. Best part of the trip.

This shouldn’t be a “cozy” read. Two orphan girls battle abusive adults in the middle of winter? Idon’t care. This book and everything about it just makes me so happy. Simon! The cheese basket. Raw eggs! The cart with geese! The frickin’ tinker’s children’s disguises they wear (what are tinker’s children anyway?) All the best parts of childhood in book form. You know what? I need to reread this.

From Goodreads:

It was dusk - winter dusk. Snow lay white and shining over the pleated hills, and icicles hung from the forest trees.

Wicked wolves and a grim governess threaten Bonnie and her cousin Sylvia when Bonnie's parents leave Willoughby Chase for a sea voyage. Left in the care of the cruel Miss Slighcarp, the girls can hardly believe what is happening to their once happy home. The servants are dismissed, the furniture is sold, and Bonnie and Sylvia are sent to a prison-like orphan school. It seems as if the endless hours of drudgery will never cease.

With the help of Simon the gooseboy and his flock, they escape. But how will they ever get Willoughby Chase free from the clutches of the evil Miss Slighcarp?


Burial Rites by Hannah Kent 

Burial Rites 
by Hannah Kent 

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: no
Published: September 10th 2013
Rating: THAT. ENDING.  I am still angry.
Times read: 1. Because I am still mad.
Recommended by: Pretty sure this book got a whole lot of buzz a couple of years ago.

Someone said that the difference between YA and adult books is the discovery of potential vs. the death of potential. I have furthered this theory that the difference between literary fiction and genre fiction is the amount of body oder and snot the main character exudes. This book is definitely an illustration in that. But is you can hack it’s bleakness the writing is spectacular and the meticulously researched setting of 19th century Iceland is unusual. It is also based on the true story of the last woman executed in Iceland. PSA: the audiobook is excellent.

To know what a person has done, and to know who a person is, are very different things.

From Goodreads:

A brilliant literary debut, inspired by a true story: the final days of a young woman accused of murder in Iceland in 1829. 

Set against Iceland's stark landscape, Hannah Kent brings to vivid life the story of Agnes, who, charged with the brutal murder of her former master, is sent to an isolated farm to await execution. 

Horrified at the prospect of housing a convicted murderer, the family at first avoids Agnes. Only Tóti, a priest Agnes has mysteriously chosen to be her spiritual guardian, seeks to understand her. But as Agnes's death looms, the farmer's wife and their daughters learn there is another side to the sensational story they've heard. 

Riveting and rich with lyricism, Burial Rites evokes a dramatic existence in a distant time and place, and asks the question, how can one woman hope to endure when her life depends upon the stories told by others?


The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Winternight Trilogy #1
Published: January 10th 2017
Rating: retold fairy tales are my jam
Times read: 1
Recommended by: twitter

My family had this book of 365 stories that had a story or part of a story to be read each night. There was a whole section on Vasilisa and Baba Yaga and I was so creeped out by it that to this day I still get the willies. But in, like, the best posible way.I am also a huge fan of retold fairy tales. The Bear and the Nightengale is a fresh retelling if the Vasilisa fairy tale but with the deliciously creepy feel that takes you back to childhood.

Nothing changes, Vasya. Things are, or they are not. Magic is forgetting that something ever was other than as you willed it.

From Goodreads:

At the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn't mind--she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse's fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon, who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

After Vasilisa's mother dies, her father goes to Moscow and brings home a new wife. Fiercely devout, city-bred, Vasilisa's new stepmother forbids her family from honoring the household spirits. The family acquiesces, but Vasilisa is frightened, sensing that more hinges upon their rituals than anyone knows.

And indeed, crops begin to fail, evil creatures of the forest creep nearer, and misfortune stalks the village. All the while, Vasilisa's stepmother grows ever harsher in her determination to groom her rebellious stepdaughter for either marriage or confinement in a convent.

As danger circles, Vasilisa must defy even the people she loves and call on dangerous gifts she has long concealed--this, in order to protect her family from a threat that seems to have stepped from her nurse's most frightening tales. 


Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George

Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow 
by Jessica Day George 

Goodreads | Amazon | Audible
Series: Stand Alone
Published: January 8th 2008 
Rating: Winter fairy tales make me happy.
Times read: 2
Recommended by: Amazon in 2008, I think

Sort of Beauty and the Beastish but with a polor bear. That she has to marry. I swear it makes sense when you read it. Jessica Day George has a this lyrical quality to her writing that is perfect for this kind of story.

From Goodreads:

Love you always, miss you always... running day and night, leaving the place of sun and moon, of ice and snow.
Never look back, never forget.

"Blessed" or "cursed" with an ability to understand animals, the Lass (as she's known to her family) has always been an oddball. And when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out, and promises that her family will become rich if only the Lass will accompany him to his castle, she doesn't hesitate. But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants. Only a grueling journey on the backs of the four winds will reveal the truth: the bear is really a prince who's been enchanted by a troll queen, and the Lass must come up with a way to free him before he's forced to marry a troll princess. 


Frost Hollow Hall by Emma Carroll 

Frost Hollow Hall
by Emma Carroll 

Goodreads | Amazon
Series: Stand Alone
Published: October 3rd 2013 
Rating: TBR
Times read: TBR because there is no kindle version so I have to wait until the summer and get it them and drag it bak to China with my in my luggage.
Recommended by: Goodreads

I am crabby that I have to wait. China is getting me down.

From Goodreads:

The gates to Frost Hollow Hall loomed before us. They were great tall things, the ironwork all twisted leaves and queer-looking flowers. And they were very definitely shut.

Tilly's heart sinks. Will's at the door of their cottage, daring her to come ice-skating up at Frost Hollow Hall. No one goes near the place these days. Rumour has it that the house is haunted . . . Ten years ago the young heir, Kit Barrington, drowned there in the lake. But Tilly never turns down a dare.

Then it goes horribly wrong. The ice breaks, Tilly falls through and almost drowns. At the point of death, a beautiful angel appears in the water and saves her. Kit Barrington's ghost.

Kit needs Tilly to solve the mystery of his death, so that his spirit can rest in peace. In order to discover all she can, Tilly gets work as a maid at Frost Hollow Hall. But the place makes her flesh crawl. It's all about the dead here, she's told, and in the heart of the house she soon discovers all manner of dark secrets . . .

'Frost Hollow Hall' is a thrilling historical fiction debut. Told in Tilly's unique voice, it is a tale of love and loss, and how forgiveness is the key to recovery. 


The Complete Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

The Complete Calvin and Hobbes
by Bill Watterson

Goodreads | Amazon
Series: Stand Alone
Published: September 6th 2005 
Rating: The best comic strip ever
Times read: without number
Recommended by: My parents got us Calvin and Hobbes books every year for Christmas.

For a comic written 20 to 30 years ago Calvin and and Hobbes still feels current and fresh. My favorite strips are the ones set in winter. Calvin making snowmen, his defensive letters to Santa, the philosophical discussions that happen when they sled down a hill, I love them all.

Reality continues to ruin my life.

From Goodreads:

alvin and Hobbes is unquestionably one of the most popular comic strips of all time. The imaginative world of a boy and his real-only-to-him tiger was first syndicated in 1985 and appeared in more than 2,400 newspapers when Bill Watterson retired on January 1, 1996. The entire body of Calvin and Hobbescartoons published in a truly noteworthy tribute to this singular cartoon in The Complete Calvin and Hobbes. Composed of three hardcover, four-color volumes in a sturdy slipcase, this New York Times best-selling edition includes all Calvin and Hobbescartoons that ever appeared in syndication. This is the treasure that all Calvin and Hobbes fans seek.


Winter Magic Edited by Abi Elphinstone

Winter Magic
Edited by Abi Elphinstone

Goodreads | Amazon
Series: Stand Alone
Published: November 3rd 2016)
Rating: Adorable anthology
Times read: 1
Recommended by: Goodreads

Be content. Be watchful. Be brave.’ He glanced towards the kennel and the snow around his big, dark eyes gathered into wrinkles. ‘And never stop believing in miracles.

This is the perfect anthology if you are looking for something soft, magical, and wintery. I have been reading it aloud to my seventh grade mentor group the last week and they got very into it.

From Goodreads:

A beautiful and classic anthology of frosty, magical short stories from acclaimed children’s writers such as Michelle Magorian, Berlie Doherty, Lauren St John and Katherine Woodfine, and edited by author Abi Elphinstone.
Dreamsnatcher’s Abi Elphinstone heads up this gorgeous collection of wintery stories, featuring snow queens, frost fairs, snow dragons and pied pipers . . . from classic children’s writers such as Michelle Magorian, Geraldine McCaughrean, Jamila Gavin, Berlie Doherty, Katherine Woodfine, Piers Torday, Lauren St John, Amy Alward and Emma Carroll, among others.
An unmissable, enchanting treat of a collection that will be enjoyed for years to come, by readers of all ages. 

Hey, does anyone have a recommendation for a retelling of The Snow Queen?

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