Nauru

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Islands of the Frigate Bird by Daryl Tarte

Islands of the Frigate Bird by 

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Atoll life is lonely, even when surrounded by the abundance of the sea. But it is here that man's indomitable will conquered the sea in an epic drift aboard a canoe; it is here that massive schools of tuna find their way after migrating across the vast Pacific. Since the days of the early islanders, change has always come to the central Pacific violently: when the second world war reached the islands, they became battleground, the scars of which they still carry; when the islands were used as testing grounds for atomic bombs, its people became military guinea pigs; and, most recently, the prospect of global warming threatens to erase the islands from the map entirely. Here, all the players in this rich drama have a voice and a story to tell. Above all, Islands of the Frigate Bird is the magnificent saga of the people of the central Pacific-people who have battled every type of political, commercial and cultural onslaught from outsiders in order to retain their identity.


Paper Pots: A Story from Nauru by Floria Detabene, Samuel Sakaria (Illustrator)

Paper Pots: A Story from Nauru by Floria Detabene, Samuel Sakaria (Illustrator)

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Mobrig and his mother make some special plant pots that help little seedlings grow into strong plants. 


Stories from Nauru  Want to Read   Rate this book 1 of 5 stars2 of 5 stars3 of 5 stars4 of 5 stars5 of 5 stars Stories from Nauru by Ben Bam Solomon, Elmina Quadina, Eston Thoma, Pamela Scriven, Jerielyn Jeremiah, Lucia Bill, Makerita Va'ai

Stories from Nauru by Ben Bam Solomon, Elmina Quadina, Eston Thoma, Pamela Scriven, Jerielyn Jeremiah, Lucia Bill, Makerita Va'ai

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Short stories from the small Pacific island nation


The Undesirables: Inside Nauru by Mark Isaacs

The Undesirables: Inside Nauru by Mark Isaacs

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'How long will we be here?' one man asked.

Nobody could answer him. Nobody knew. The intention was clear: this was the No Advantage policy. Take them to a distant island, lock them away, punish them, forget about them. Criminals were given a sentence to serve; these men were not even given that. Lost hope ebbed out of the men in uncontrollable sobs and tears. 

Queue jumper, boat person, illegals. Asylum seekers are contentious front-page news but obtaining information about Australia’s regional processing centres is increasingly difficult. We learn only what the government wants us to know.

Mark Isaacs worked for the Salvation Army inside the Nauru Detention Centre soon after it re-opened in 2012. He provided humanitarian aid to the men interned in the camp. What he saw there moved him to speak out.

The Undesirables chronicles his time on Nauru detailing daily life and the stories of the men held there; the self-harm, suicide attempts, and riots; the rare moments of joy; the moments of deep despair.

Mark's eyewitness account humanises a political debate usually ruled by misleading rhetoric.A